About

Liz is an experienced Script Reader with a demonstrated history of working in the entertainment industry. She is skilled in writing coverages, technical writing, transcription services, proofreading, editing, speech coaching, and teaching English as a foreign language. She has a BA focused on Linguistics from San Diego State University-California State University.

Liz Brenner

Reader, Writer, Teacher, Speaker, Blogger

I started reading at a very young age, and I was immediately hooked. Along with books, my favorite toy when I was a kid was a spiral notebook and a pencil. A pencil, not a pen. I have always preferred a pencil.

I was born to read and write. I used to read everything I could get my hands on, and I would reread and reread and reread my favorite books. I would do the same with my favorite movies and TV shows. I would watch and rewatch and rewatch them. I would drive my family insane with my reruns. They said it was a waste of time to watch or read something I already knew. It wasn’t until I was much older and I met a published comedy writer who told me that I wasn’t wasting time at all. I was studying the art of storytelling. It’s why, he told me, that I am such a good storyteller. I’ve been studying stories all my life.

Storytelling comes in two main forms – written and spoken. The written and spoken languages are completely independent of each other. We don’t write the way that we speak, and we don’t speak the way that we write. However, if we can learn to do both, we can translate our ideas into engaging content. Engaging with your audience, whether they are students, clients, prospects, or your family, is the key to any kind of success.

Speaking and writing are two separate languages, and to be an effective storyteller, a person needs to learn both languages in order to transition between them. A speaker can use body language, eye contact and tone of voice to make a point. A writer does not have these tools available and must use explicit language to convey the same ideas. This is why there are so many arguments on social media. The intended sarcasm or joke is not expressed clearly in the writing, and misunderstandings arise.  

I have used my storytelling skills in all aspects of my personal life. I have learned to incorporate humorous stories into my public speaking to make my presentations more engaging. I include personal stories with my English lessons so that my students are inspired by the topics of interest to them. I use my love of storytelling to analyze scripts and manuscripts to develop them to their greatest potential. I use my positive and supportive mentoring skills to work with my writers and my students so that they can achieve their own greatest storytelling potential. Storytelling has always been the key to my success.

I started writing when I was just a kid. I would leave my mom notes on her coffee pot. The notes were the usual things a child tells her mother such as where I was going, what time I would be home or what I needed at the store. I learned, over time, that if I could make my mother laugh, I could write my way out of trouble. I also learned that if I could make her laugh, she would say yes to whatever I might be requesting. The notes became a tradition. As I grew up, the format changed. I no longer left her scribbles at the coffee pot. We started to exchange emails. This continued up until her death. I never really gave much thought to our notes. It was just a game that we played. I didn’t realize, until she had passed, how much this tradition meant to her. She loved my notes. She saved my notes. They were precious to her.

I decided, on her passing, that I would continue to post notes to her on social media. It was my way of keeping our tradition alive. I thought that maybe my family would get a kick out of it. I have been pleasantly shocked and surprised at the enormously positive response that I have gotten from my followers. People love my stories. Who knew?

My blog is a tribute to my mom. It is an example of the storytelling that I use to promote my speaking, my teaching and my mentoring. Storytelling is an ancient form of communication, but it continues to maintain human connections, even in the digital age.